World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

Definition of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in The Network Encyclopedia.

What is W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)?

World Wide Web Consortium, or W3C, is a vendor-neutral organization created in 1994 that develops common, interoperable protocols for the World Wide Web (WWW). Represented by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the United States and a number of international research centers, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) provides a variety of services to its member organizations, including the following:

  • Discussion groups and meetings on issues relating to the evolution of the WWW
  • Repositories of information, reference documents, and code relating to WWW protocols, services, and applications
  • The creation and testing of applications that demonstrate new types of WWW technologies

The director of the W3C is Tim Berners-Lee, the creator of the WWW. Membership in the W3C is tailored to organizations, but individuals can become affiliate members for an annual fee. For additional information about the WWW, you can subscribe to the World Wide Web Journal, produced by O’Reilly & Associates.

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