bonding

Bonding is a way of combining multiple DS0 channels from different circuits into a single, faster data transmission channel.

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What is Bonding (in networking)?

In Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) and T-series transmission technologies, a way of combining multiple DS0 channels from different circuits into a single, faster data transmission channel. Bonding involves inverse multiplexing and techniques for resolving timing differences among the different circuits.

Bonding is used in Basic Rate Interface ISDN (BRI-ISDN) for combining the two 64-Kbps B channels into a single 128-Kbps data transmission channel. Several different bonding protocols can be implemented for BRI-ISDN services, a common one being Multilink PPP (MPPP) for asynchronous bonding.

NOTE

Bonding must be supported by the ISDN devices at both ends of the ISDN link. Typically, one of the B channels is designated as responsible for initiating the bonding process.

TIP

Many ISDN terminal adapters can override bonding when the user wants to place a regular Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) phone call. For example, you might be using ISDN for high-speed Internet access with both B channels bonded to give you 128-Kbps (or 14-kilobytes/second) access. Then, if you suddenly pick up a phone connected to the terminal adapter’s POTS jack, bonding stops and the second B channel is freed up for the phone call. Once the call is complete, bonding will resume.